blonde poker forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 01, 2022, 11:46:45 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
2266500 Posts in 66676 Topics by 16679 Members
Latest Member: User22234
* Home Help Arcade Search Calendar Guidelines Login Register
+  blonde poker forum
|-+  Community Forums
| |-+  The Lounge
| | |-+  Chess thread
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 ... 164 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Chess thread  (Read 268881 times)
cambridgealex
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14798


#lovethegame


View Profile
« Reply #75 on: August 13, 2012, 10:29:31 PM »

Move over Kapersky, MilliDonk has returned to the board after almost 2 decades out of the game.

A 3.5hr battle of the minds resulted in the opponent being forced to resign.

Cries of "misclick" could be heard from the stands but MilliCheck does not accept prisoners.

 Click to see full-size image.


I should just point out to observers that Mr Outrageous has just moved his queen to e1, only to find that Mr Milli-hero has lopped it straight off with his own queen. Quite a dramatic error. More than a mere oopsicle.


haha ty for translating, was seriously struggling. Must be how muggles feel when they read PHA!
Logged

Poker goals:
[ ] 7 figure score
[X] 8 figure score
Tal
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24291


"He's always at it!"


View Profile
« Reply #76 on: August 13, 2012, 10:45:50 PM »

Got to be honest, extensive discussions on 3bet-ranges do make me quite sleepy...little ones I'm good with and I can hold a conversation intelligently enough but there's a limit  Tongue

There's been some chat about hEV in poker - if i can call it the happiness coefficient - on your thread, Alex. As with chess, you have to find the limit (if you will, the range) where you still find it enjoyable and make sure you stick to playing within it.

Funnily enough, I've never been a particularly big student of chess opening theory. I know a fair bit less than most players of my ability and I would certainly be a stronger player if I put more work into the hard learning. But I enjoy doing other things, particularly poker (and a bit of pool), and unless that stops, I don't see myself going too heavily into the books anytime soon. I do a bit to keep my eye in but my books at home are mostly just research tools.

That's my enjoyment limit at the moment. Some people love studying and know tons of openings inside out but can't play very well as soon as they get out of the book.

Funny bunch us chess players.
Logged

"You must take your opponent into a deep, dark forest, where 2+2=5, and the path leading out is only wide enough for one"
tikay
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: I am a geek!!



View Profile
« Reply #77 on: August 13, 2012, 11:17:23 PM »

Love that Blackburne tale, it reminds me of so many tales.

Too late tonight, but I'll comment further tomorrow on that, and your earlier tale about the bloke who cheated.
Logged

All details of the 2016 Vegas Staking Adventure can be found via this link - http://bit.ly/1pdQZDY (copyright Anthony James Kendall, 2016).
Tal
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24291


"He's always at it!"


View Profile
« Reply #78 on: August 14, 2012, 12:26:33 AM »

A final Blackburne pic before I remember I have a bed (and work in the morning).


 Click to see full-size image.


Dresden 1892
Standing: Heyde, Schmid, Blackburne, Noa, Hoffer, von Scheve, Walbrodt, Zwanzig
Sitting: Loman, Schottländer, Winawer, Mason, Schallopp, von Bardeleben, Tarrasch, Mieses, Albin, Alapin


A club player will know about half these names and tbh that's not far off where I am! A few have openings and opening variations named after them (Winawer, Tarrasch and Albin) that are played regularly today, over a century on.
Logged

"You must take your opponent into a deep, dark forest, where 2+2=5, and the path leading out is only wide enough for one"
tikay
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: I am a geek!!



View Profile
« Reply #79 on: August 14, 2012, 09:30:49 AM »

At amateur levels, there are plenty of stories any chess player can tell you about people's attempts to put them off.

One of the silly ones you get is done in a situation where you make a sacrifice. The idea of a sacrifice is to lose a piece of yours but specifically because you have a tactic behind it. So, you want your opponent to take your bishop/pawn/queen and then you can deliver the hidden checkmate, for example.

The trick you get crafty juniors (or crafty men against juniors) pulling is looking really disappointed when they make the sacrificial move. Sometimes they will actually sigh or go "oh shucks" in the hope you go "oh he's left his queen in prise! I'll have that!" and then fall into the trap. It's a real novice thing but it nevertheless actually does happen!

The most extreme form of it happened to me when I was about 11. I played in a tournament in Derby in an open-aged comp, where the players were separated into 4 groups, based on ability/rating. So I happened to be playing a man in his fifties in this particular game.

We'd played about 15 moves each and I went off to the toilet while my opponent thought about his next move. As is the way - not everyone does this but most probably do on some level - I was thinking about the position while I spent my penny and had a plan to use my already active knights to mount an attack. I had worked out a variation of moves if he made a particular response and, as I walked back to the board, had a pretty good idea of what I was going to do next.

When I got to the board, I had a shock.

The knight - the one I was going to move and mount the attack with - had moved. But it was MY knight. And it hadn't moved (as my old maths teacher used to say) in an L-shape; it had moved just one square to the left.

I haven't seen this before or since. I asked the man whether the knight had moved and he assured me it hadn't. I asked if he could see on his score sheet (all players have to record the moves on paper) when the knight moved to that square. He showed me. "Can you see on mine?" I asked, thinking about doubting myself.

While he mused, I pointed out the path the Knight had taken - b1 -> d2 -> f1 -> g3 -> f5. Why was it now on e5?!

He simply went "Oh!" and did no more than move it back to f5 and press my clock.

I was completely taken aback. To this day, I am convinced that he moved it deliberately, expecting that I wouldn't notice. When I told others the sequence of event, skullduggery was the only conclusion. There had been no accidental knocking over of pieces - so said the people on the table next to me - and he had no need to touch my knight in playing his move.

I made sure I won that game and took enormous pleasure in doing so.

I have been musing on this story for days, it is filed away in my bulging "how can you explain these things?" file.

I mean, why would he do such a dumb thing? How could he NOT be sussed?

I played in a Golf Tourney once where a 5 handicapper passed himself off, or tried to, as a 16 handicapper, & duly ran away with the Tourney, wininng by an eye-popping 8 or 10 strokes, when these things are usually 8 way ties & countback. His playing companions - we were playing in groups of 4 - would have sussed the deal the very moment he teed off at the first hole, as the gulf between a 5 & a 16 is huge to the trained eye, if not mine.

He was duly disqualified, & banned from all courses in Notts & Derby for, I think, 5 years, & his recreational golf-life was in tatters.

His prize for winning the tournament? A pair of FootJoy golf shoes, valued at £70.

How can we ever understand such peculiar things?
Logged

All details of the 2016 Vegas Staking Adventure can be found via this link - http://bit.ly/1pdQZDY (copyright Anthony James Kendall, 2016).
tikay
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: I am a geek!!



View Profile
« Reply #80 on: August 14, 2012, 09:43:21 AM »


The Henry Blackburne tale - what a great story!

This part caught my eye especially....

".....Picture the scene: a posh, Victorian London club on Pall Mall. The sort of place you have to be invited in by a friend (usually with a peerage). Blackburne is playing an amateur over several whiskeys and any number of cigars. The crowds are raucous, their surnames double-barreled. I see it as being rather like the Drones Club that Bertie Wooster likes to frequent in the Jeeves novels....."

For some reason, it reminded me very much of a chap who lived around the same era, & moved in the same circles, one Robert Standish Sievier.

Robert owned & trained THE the greatest racehorse that ever drew breath, bar none, & without a shadow of doubt, being "Sceptre". And Mr Sievier was a right scoundrel. A brief synopsis of him is here....

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/sievier-robert-standish-8425

There are some characters these days, but I fancy there used to be so many more. It is a trick of the mind, of course, but those olden-times scoundrels & rotters seem really rather loveable.

More Blackburne-type stories, please.
Logged

All details of the 2016 Vegas Staking Adventure can be found via this link - http://bit.ly/1pdQZDY (copyright Anthony James Kendall, 2016).
curnow
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 182


View Profile
« Reply #81 on: August 14, 2012, 12:05:17 PM »

Something for everyone, I hope.

Magnus Carlsen was on the US show 60 minutes a few months ago.



He's quite something.

He's filmed at, amongst other places, the London Chess Classic, which I have been to watch for the last two years. It will be on in December, I believe in Kensington Olympia. Will post details nearer the date.

interesting film , blind chess is pretty standard for chess players , took Andrew Greet to local match few years ago & on way there he was texting moves to players he was coaching , nice see a IM turn out for a local club

Logged
Tal
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24291


"He's always at it!"


View Profile
« Reply #82 on: August 14, 2012, 12:38:14 PM »

The ability to play one game blind is one thing - I used to play people at school where they could see the board and I couldn't and someone as strong as Andrew Greet (an International Master - one below a Grandmaster) would have no difficulty at all tackling a position someone described to him or where the moves were read out.

Playing multiple games blind is a different kettle of fish and it is so easy to miss something subtle (like a clever combination or a check in the middle of a variation) that even players as strong as that would find it very difficult against five or more competent players. I don't think I'm speaking out of turn there.

The third level is where Alekhine excelled. It wasn't the fact that he played multiple blindfold games simultaneously; it was the quality of those games. He found incredible combinations that would be applauded in an ordinary 'over the board' match against a single opponent.

It is wonderful watching GMs analyse games with each other. Even if they don't speak the same language, pointing to squares and gesturing with a piece is often enough to draw appreciative nods from the other player. Meanwhile the people watching - called kibitzers in chess circles (is that an expression used in poker?) - look at each other for an explanation of what on earth they're on about.
Logged

"You must take your opponent into a deep, dark forest, where 2+2=5, and the path leading out is only wide enough for one"
millidonk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9140


I'm supposed to wear a shell.. I don't - SLUG LIFE


View Profile
« Reply #83 on: August 14, 2012, 12:44:13 PM »

Never heard Kibitzer in poker, although if it was said it would probably come from the likes of Eli Elezra, The Schulmans or even the great Stu Ungar himself.


Logged

tikay
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: I am a geek!!



View Profile
« Reply #84 on: August 14, 2012, 12:58:12 PM »

The ability to play one game blind is one thing - I used to play people at school where they could see the board and I couldn't and someone as strong as Andrew Greet (an International Master - one below a Grandmaster) would have no difficulty at all tackling a position someone described to him or where the moves were read out.

Playing multiple games blind is a different kettle of fish and it is so easy to miss something subtle (like a clever combination or a check in the middle of a variation) that even players as strong as that would find it very difficult against five or more competent players. I don't think I'm speaking out of turn there.

The third level is where Alekhine excelled. It wasn't the fact that he played multiple blindfold games simultaneously; it was the quality of those games. He found incredible combinations that would be applauded in an ordinary 'over the board' match against a single opponent.

It is wonderful watching GMs analyse games with each other. Even if they don't speak the same language, pointing to squares and gesturing with a piece is often enough to draw appreciative nods from the other player. Meanwhile the people watching - called kibitzers in chess circles (is that an expression used in poker?) - look at each other for an explanation of what on earth they're on about.


Ooh, a new word. I went googling, & found this....


1. a spectator at a card game who looks at the players' cards over their shoulders, especially one who gives unsolicited advice.
2. a giver of uninvited or unwanted advice.
3. a person who jokes, chitchats, or makes wisecracks, especially while others are trying to work or to discuss something seriously.


So you are right.

I shall use it somewhere. Today.

I am more used to the 2nd description, "a giver of unwanted advice".

I made a daft bet yesterday which deservedly lost, & then someone told me this morming "why did you do that, it was a daft bet?".

Kibitzers ftw.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 01:01:04 PM by tikay » Logged

All details of the 2016 Vegas Staking Adventure can be found via this link - http://bit.ly/1pdQZDY (copyright Anthony James Kendall, 2016).
Tal
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24291


"He's always at it!"


View Profile
« Reply #85 on: August 14, 2012, 01:00:39 PM »

Railbirds is probably the name more commonly used in poker, on reflection.

They tend to hunt in packs, somehow knowing when a king is in trouble or when a player was under time pressure. A bit like when there's an all in and a call.

Kibitzers love asking you afterwards "Why didn't you play this instead?" A bit like "You should have jammed the turn. You just let him catch up cos he was always checking behind"

Yeah thanks for that!
Logged

"You must take your opponent into a deep, dark forest, where 2+2=5, and the path leading out is only wide enough for one"
tikay
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: I am a geek!!



View Profile
« Reply #86 on: August 14, 2012, 01:03:05 PM »

Railbirds is probably the name more commonly used in poker, on reflection.

They tend to hunt in packs, somehow knowing when a king is in trouble or when a player was under time pressure. A bit like when there's an all in and a call.

Kibitzers love asking you afterwards "Why didn't you play this instead?" A bit like "You should have jammed the turn. You just let him catch up cos he was always checking behind"

Yeah thanks for that!

Lol, spot on. Don't you just love those sorts?
Logged

All details of the 2016 Vegas Staking Adventure can be found via this link - http://bit.ly/1pdQZDY (copyright Anthony James Kendall, 2016).
curnow
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 182


View Profile
« Reply #87 on: August 14, 2012, 01:18:34 PM »

no idea how Magnus Carlsen plays bullet chess with clocks , find it hard on internet chess sites

about 9/10 years ago used to play 15 round tourney 1min each , they offered $80 for winner which got few GM's/IM's & FM's playing , was nice to play few knowing you gonna be beat , if we got 7/15 was pretty good but about 45 moves was about most I could play , the masters all used premoves which you could use to your advantage but still always lost lol

dont know if ICC still does it or any other site
Logged
Tal
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24291


"He's always at it!"


View Profile
« Reply #88 on: August 14, 2012, 01:31:49 PM »

no idea how Magnus Carlsen plays bullet chess with clocks , find it hard on internet chess sites

about 9/10 years ago used to play 15 round tourney 1min each , they offered $80 for winner which got few GM's/IM's & FM's playing , was nice to play few knowing you gonna be beat , if we got 7/15 was pretty good but about 45 moves was about most I could play , the masters all used premoves which you could use to your advantage but still always lost lol

dont know if ICC still does it or any other site

Nor do I in truth. Problem is so many strong chess players make their money playing poker now. Chess is a live pursuit for a lot of them, with expenses etc covered by the organisers.
Logged

"You must take your opponent into a deep, dark forest, where 2+2=5, and the path leading out is only wide enough for one"
ACE2M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7841



View Profile
« Reply #89 on: August 14, 2012, 01:51:06 PM »

Not quite sure how you've got me watching post game analysis vids on youtube. Doesn't half expose how crap i am.  I do like to play the timed games but i prob need to play the long games so i can actually spend some time thinking a bit bigger.

Its funny when carlsen reviews a game that he can remember every little move and every potential move he thought about along the way, i wonder what percentage of his brilliance is down to having an incredible memory.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 ... 164 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.27 seconds with 20 queries.