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Tal
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« Reply #2280 on: September 18, 2015, 09:17:41 AM »

Great post Tal, really enjoyed reading it.

Me too, some good analogies there, which helped me understand better.

Well done Tal Bloke, you must be chuffed to bits with that victory.

Does your rating go up now, as a result of that win?

Local leagues (and weekend comps) aren't internationally rated, but they count towards the national grade.

http://www.ecfgrading.org.uk/new/menu.php

109,641 players are recorded in this database. Not all are active, mind.

The system is pretty simple: your grade is calculated on your last year's games, or, if you haven't played 30 in the last year, on your last 30 games.

For each individual game, you get a score based on your opponent's grade:
- beat them and you get his/her grade +50
- draw with them and you get his/her grade
- lose to them and you get his/her grade -50

Add all the scores up, divide by 30 or more if you played more in the last 12 months and that's your new grade.

So, by beating a 206, I get 256 points towards my next grade.

There is one caveat: if there is a big gap between your and your opponent's grade (>40 points), you can't gain from losing to a higher rated opponent and you must benefit from beating a lower rated opponent.

So, if a 200 plays a 150 and the 200 wins (as he should):
- the 200 gets HIS OWN grade +10 (210)
- the other player gets HIS OWN grade -10 (140)

Hope that makes sense. 
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tikay
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« Reply #2281 on: September 18, 2015, 09:27:29 AM »



Yes, makes perfect sense. So that win might just help lift your 30 game average - it can't be often that you beat someone ranked that much higher. 

Your local club is, presumably, one of the best in the country?

I was thinking during the exclamation point debate that in chess annotation, an exclamation mark is actually used to denote "interesting move". Don't tell Tom though.
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tikay
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« Reply #2282 on: September 18, 2015, 09:30:04 AM »



Silly question incoming, but I just spotted these......




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_notation


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_annotation_symbols



Remind me - I do know, obviously - the difference between "notation" & "annotation".
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Tal
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« Reply #2283 on: September 18, 2015, 09:46:41 AM »



Yes, makes perfect sense. So that win might just help lift your 30 game average - it can't be often that you beat someone ranked that much higher. 

Your local club is, presumably, one of the best in the country?

I was thinking during the exclamation point debate that in chess annotation, an exclamation mark is actually used to denote "interesting move". Don't tell Tom though.

Exactly.

The club is pretty strong for local leagues, yes. We are certainly the biggest in the Midlands.


Silly question incoming, but I just spotted these......

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_notation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_annotation_symbols

Remind me - I do know, obviously - the difference between "notation" & "annotation".

Notation is the way of recording the moves. Annotation is the shorthand comments on those moves (good, excellent, interesting, dubious, poor, blunder, unclear position, etc)

Different countries use different letters for pieces in notation. We use N for Knight, but the Germans use S (Springer - "jumper"). We use B for bishop, but the French use F (Fou - fool, but he used to be an elephant).

http://www.chess.com/blog/rishikeshwaran/the-history-of-chess-pieces
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« Reply #2284 on: October 09, 2015, 04:49:24 PM »

I've typed this out on my 'phone, so apologies if the predictive text has changed any of the moves. Shout if anything doesn't make sense.

White: Hero
Black: Villain
Opening: King's Indian Attack

1.Nf3 Nf6
2.g3 d5
3.Bg2 Bg4
4.d3 c6
5.Nbd2 e6
6.o-o Be7
7.Qe1 o-o
8.e4 Nbd7
9.h3 Bh5
10.e5 Ne8
11.Nh2 Nc7
12.f4 f6

(Black needs to break something up to get play for his pieces or he will end up getting cramped)

13.exf6 Bxf6
14.Ndf3 c5
15.a4 a6
16.a5 Kh8  (allows him to let the e pawn go in some tactical variations without giving check)
17.Ra4 Bg6
18.Ng4 c4
19.NxB gxN
20.f5! (A killer sacrifice. Black threatened to make a comeback but now his position is blown wide open)
20...    Bxf5
21.Nh4 Bg6
22.NxB+ hxN
23.Qe3 (threatens nasties and stops Nc5)
                Qe7
24.dxc Qc5
25.QxQ NxQ
26.Rb4 d4
27.Bh6 Rf7
28.Bf4 Rd7
29.BxN RxB
30.Rxf6 Kg7
31.Rf1 Rb8
32.b3 Nd7
33.Kf2 Kf6
34.Ke2+ Ke7
35.Rf4 e5
36.Rg4 Kf7
37.Bd5+ Kf6
38.Be4 g5
39.h4 gxh
40.gxh Rh8
41.Rxb7 RxR
42.BxR Nc5
43.Bd5 Kf5
44.Kf3 Re8
45.Rg5+ Kf6
46.Be4 d3
47.cxd Nxb3
48.Rg6+ Kf7
49.Rxa6 Rh8
50.Bd5+ Ke7
51.Re6+ Kd7
52.Rxe5 Rxh4
53.a6 Nd4
54.Kg3 Resigns


1-0

There are two schools of thought when playing a stronger player. If you go for sharp, complicated tactics, he might miss something in the carnage and you can biff him. But my old coach used to say to me you haven't got a hope against these players doing that, because they see everything. He suggested a quiet game, where you force them to do something. If you build a solid position and gradually come forward, you can pressure the opponent into taking risks and leave him positionally exposed.

I played a very quiet game, very positional and steady. My opponent also played quietly early on. This allowed me to develop my pieces, get everything onto a good square and have a great shape to my game. It's exactly what I was hoping for.

As the game developed, his passive play allowed me to make a couple of long-term moves, which I hoped would pay off if I could build and maintain some pressure. He then made a slight misstep and allowed me to get a bishop for a knight, meaning I had a bishop pair in a position that was threatening to open up. 

All the while, I kept building the pressure and not taking risks. Then the time came where he made some counter threats and I had to decide what to do. I found a positional pawn sacrifice to blow the centre open and swap his other bishop off for my other knight. I now had a winning endgame.

Well played Tal. Presumably you haven't forgotten this game in a hurry. Could you give us a bit of insight into the psychological games occurring on the kingside between your knights on f3 and h2 and his bishop on h5 as it looks the first key point of the game to me. Did you want him to exchange his bishop for a knight and had you considered re-positioning the h2 knight to g4.

The h5 bishop looked weak, on the h5 to d1 diagonal it did nothing and it had long term limited upside due to the pawn structure. As much as I love my bishop pair, I'd of cut loose the dead weight by exchanging on f3 and concentrating on building up a solid position in the middle of the board. Your opponent looks to have dilly dallied around the side of the board from moves 12-16. Finding himself in a worse position he came up with a bishop h5-g6 and the c4 pawn push to get himself back in the game. At this point all your pieces had good scope but his centre looked passive.

ps i like the Ra4 maneuver.



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Tal
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« Reply #2285 on: October 12, 2015, 07:27:37 PM »

That's it in a nutshell, McGlashan: Black played too passively and allowed me to build a nice position. I don't think there was a specific move I can point to and highlight as the wrong'un.

I played a very different sort of game at the weekend for the county: bits pointing at other bits all over the place. Looked more like an MMORPG than a beat'em up. A couple of nerve steadiers from each of us, the queens came off and the position was drawn. Funny how these things peter out sometimes; a draw looked the least likely result for the vast majority of the game. It was a much more familiar game for me. I love a good swashbuckling affair. Could you imagine someone using my moniker otherwise?

As to Ra4, that move was often a feature of Mikhail Tal's games. It's called jumping off and can be hugely effective at building a quick attack on the kingside or in the centre. Why move all those pieces out the way when the fourth rank is free?

Oh and before I forget, here are the ticket details for the London Chess Classic in December:

http://en.chessbase.com/post/only-two-months-away-the-7th-london-chess-classic
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 07:31:10 PM by Tal » Logged

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« Reply #2286 on: October 13, 2015, 05:35:46 PM »

Chess books were always my favourite learning resource. The author would guide you through the lines of an opening, but more importantly, they'd instruct you on how to play the typical position that arrives from that opening.

Looking at Tal's game in a computer, it confirms boxing his knight in back at h2 was strong, but it doesn't tell you why. It would take quite a lot of tinkering about to discover why some things work and others don't.
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« Reply #2287 on: October 13, 2015, 05:43:13 PM »

Two weeks ago, I played my first game of chess in years. Well to be specific it was my first 8 games in years as I played 8 of the pupils at my school simultaneously.

In hindsight perhaps this was a tad optimistic as one enterprising young fellow spotted a tactic that I missed completely and ended up forking my queen after offering a piece that I gleefully accepted. Was quite pleased to go 7-1 though considering my extended break from the game.

Have to say, I thoroughly enjoyed it and am looking forward to the rematches later in the term.
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Tal
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« Reply #2288 on: October 14, 2015, 08:21:52 PM »

Chess books were always my favourite learning resource. The author would guide you through the lines of an opening, but more importantly, they'd instruct you on how to play the typical position that arrives from that opening.

Looking at Tal's game in a computer, it confirms boxing his knight in back at h2 was strong, but it doesn't tell you why. It would take quite a lot of tinkering about to discover why some things work and others don't.

The best way to learn is to try it out and see what happens. No different to poker in that respect.

Two weeks ago, I played my first game of chess in years. Well to be specific it was my first 8 games in years as I played 8 of the pupils at my school simultaneously.

In hindsight perhaps this was a tad optimistic as one enterprising young fellow spotted a tactic that I missed completely and ended up forking my queen after offering a piece that I gleefully accepted. Was quite pleased to go 7-1 though considering my extended break from the game.

Have to say, I thoroughly enjoyed it and am looking forward to the rematches later in the term.

Fantastic!

Did anything surprise you about the way they played? Did they sit back and let you come forward or did they launch at you from the off?

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« Reply #2289 on: October 14, 2015, 08:26:44 PM »

What I call "jumping off", the Americans call a Rook Lift.

Here's one of Tal's masterpieces. The rook lift is what makes his attack work. That and the genius of his tactics.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1139718&kpage=3

While I'm at it, have some others

https://chess24.com/en/community/chess-players/the-magical--tactical--mikhail-tal
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« Reply #2290 on: November 06, 2015, 07:21:00 AM »

Kramnik likely to miss out on Candidates place:

http://en.chessbase.com/post/candidates-will-take-place-in-march-in-moscow

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« Reply #2291 on: November 06, 2015, 08:09:34 AM »

Fastest finger first.



You have the white pieces. You are playing India's number two, Pentala Harikrishna, 2740. He has just played Rc5 to stop your mate threat on h5.

The player who actually had the white pieces in this game missed a deadly riposte.

Article, pictures, reports and solution here:

http://en.chessbase.com/post/ecc-2015-r5-siberia-and-nona-lead
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« Reply #2292 on: November 09, 2015, 01:19:15 PM »

On 9 November 1936, Mikhail Tal was born.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Tal

http://en.chessbase.com/post/mikhail-tal-a-favourite-of-caissa

http://www.edinburghchessclub.co.uk/ecctal.htm

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« Reply #2293 on: November 10, 2015, 07:27:01 PM »

is it Rd5  ?
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« Reply #2294 on: November 10, 2015, 07:36:20 PM »

is it Rd5  ?

That almost works, but g6 then keeps Black alive.

Rd3 is an immediate resignation.
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